Tabs open on your screen right now:
Work: University of Missouri (was away from my laptop all afternoon.)

If you had to brag about yourself:
I wouldn’t. It’s not about me 🙂

Your writer crush:
Too many. Living or dead?

Favorite lyric:
“Twenty years of schooling/and they put you on the day shift/look out, kid.”

Any place in the world:
Right here in New York. Why do you think I commute every week from the mid-west?

Best breakfast:
Eggs with whatever. Coffee. Lots of time.

Favorite online places right now:
TCM

Sweetest thing:
Living

Your rituals (writing or not):
Nope

Least impressive thing about you:
You’re kidding

Favorite space to write:
Summer place in Green Co., NY

What should we know:
There’s a good chance a dictator could become the next Pres. of the United States.

Guilty literary pleasure:
Anything by Sheila Weller (but I’m not guilty)

Best book nobody talks about:  
I’m a poet. The list stretches into the distance. Living or dead?

Character (TV, book, movie) you most identify with:
Nope

Last time you lied:
Today

The lie:
Everything you’ve just read

Question you secretly want to be asked:
Is your band available for a gig?

The answer:
Yes

.

.


Cornelius Eady is the author of eight books of poetry, including Hardheaded Weather: New and Selected Poems(Putnam, April 2008). His second book,Victims of the Latest Dance Craze, won the Lamont Prize from the Academy of American Poets in 1985; in 2001 Brutal Imagination was a finalist for the National Book Award. His work in theater includes the libretto for an opera, “Running Man,” which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Drama in 1999. His play, “Brutal Imagination,” won Newsday’s Oppenheimer award in 2002. In 1996 Eady co-founded, with writer Toi Derricotte, the Cave Canem summer workshop/retreat for African American poets. More than a decade later, Cave Canem is a thriving national network of black poets, as well as an institution offering regional workshops, readings, a first book prize, and the summer retreat. Eady has been a teacher for more than twenty years, and is now a professor at Notre Dame University.

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