TWO POEMS

E.C. BELLI

FIELD GUIDE TO ONENESS

.
It does not begin in an empty room, as one would
expect. The field you are standing in does not look
onto nothing. In fact, there is no field. Imagine
instead a crowded setting. The clinking and gloomy
chatter concerned with politics or matters
of worse importance,
everlasting. And then the dream of standing
in a field that looks onto nothing
itself everlasting. To know oneness, one must
first be surrounded. There are good places to go
like airports in bad weather and where they sell
puppies, silver jewelry. Also the Natural History museum
where you learn that amoebas look just like
constellations. Marriages are fine places too.
There is swarming there, and it often gets
very warm. That’s what I have found. To discover
true oneness, one must first know deep affection.
Mutual dedication. Additionally, the range of tragic
emotions oneness can offer
is best experienced without warning. The surprise
of the onset is key
to experiencing the full bludgeon to the heart
oneness can deliver. If you plan well and fall
into situations such as the death
of a loved one, or your mother
suddenly forsakes you, as they do, or if
by chance you are stumbling back into the world,
naked and born anew after a long
and tender relationship,
you are lucky. Oneness will come
easily. It is important to remember
however, that after oneness settles, it may be tough
To remove. Like blood and indelible markers, the sections
of the mind oneness perches itself onto can be hard
to reset. Similarly to radioactivity
its effects can be felt for years. Benefits
however include an ability to pick up your roots
from under your skirt and graft yourself
from one setting
to another while experiencing a minimal amount
of heartbreak. Benefits also include sitting
in an empty room feeling complete, or standing
in a field that looks onto
nothing, not wondering why things are as they are.
Close relatives to oneness include seclusion,
solitude, some others too. Watch for them
at night especially, at dusk often,
in couples and busy cities. Sometimes also on television.

.

MIGHT

,
Each large creature, barely carved.
An iced stretch of starlight.

Like days of breaking glass.

Your eyes were prongs
in the tremendous dawn.

Mandolins moving against the sky.
But whose hands.
*
like a lure like an oboe-grade hollowness
like an end-of-days grief like

……………………………………….seven empty coasters
like the chatter dying down like incessant
pining……………………………………….like
………..neutral hues and complex sound like
the fire like that blue
………………………………………………..taking
the loins savagely like asking
to be…….. dismantled again by you
*
and suddenly a surge …… in the …….fragrant hour
the she-forests, their silver
…………………………………………………………………coats
the coast, all sullen and nowhere
in sight……………………………………….was it you
………those cymbals the cedars still lunar
a smolder lashing the doleful
………………………………………………….horizon
the savage blossoming we call…………………. dawn

E.C. BELLI is a bilingual writer and translator. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in VERSE, AGNI, Antioch Review, and Caketrain, among others. The Nothing Bird, a selected volume of her translations of French poet Pierre Peuchmaurd, appeared with Oberlin College Press (2013), and her translation of Emmanuelle Guattari’s short novel I, Little Asylum was released by Semiotext(e) as part of an exhibit for the Whitney Museum’s 2014 Biennial.